Powerline networking (1 Viewer)

eetaylog

Portal Pro
March 6, 2007
874
41
39
South London
England England
Has anyone had any luck with running their home media network over mains powerline adapters?

I had some D-link 10/100 units at home that I set up between server and client via my bt home hub router as a test and video (sd & hd) seems generally pretty stuttery and MP eventually hangs on the client.

I see that there are gigabit AV2 models on the market now, but reviews say that powerline LAN units generally run at half the claimed data rates (at best). Anyone had any luck?
 

RonD

Test Group
  • Team MediaPortal
  • December 20, 2011
    904
    275
    SillyValley CA
    United States of America United States of America
    Country flag
    I tried TP-Link AV1 "200 Mbps" units in my generic USA 1 bedroom apartment to go from bedroom "computer desk" MP-Server area to living room TV MP-client. Doing a disk copy of large file (4+GB tv recording) to client system shows a useful PowerLine bandwidth about 55 Mbps, 6.5 MB/sec disk copy speed. If I use the powerline linkspeed tools they show about 130 Mbps, but real BW is the lower 55 Mbps number. If I put both TP-Link units in the same dual socket power outlet, I get around 80 Mbps useful link speeds (9.1 MB/sec disk copy) but obviously this is not very useful. The powerline linkspeed tools show around 180 Mbps, so this is close to the 200 Mbps "spec number".

    In general the 55 Mbps useful BW is enough for MP-Client, but I see some video glitches,. Suspect its noise on the power line, maybe refrigerator motor turning on/off, or something else causing power line noise. As a test I put my paper shredder in the living room, different outlet than the TP-Link, and shedding paper causes total wipeout of powerline network. MP-Client video shows total breakup/freeze until the shredder is done eating the paper. I ended up using a 50 foot (15 M) Cat5 ethernet cable, works much better.
     
    Last edited:

    CyberSimian

    Test Group
  • Team MediaPortal
  • June 10, 2013
    2,017
    1,250
    Southampton
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Country flag
    I see that there are gigabit AV2 models on the market now, but reviews say that powerline LAN units generally run at half the claimed data rates (at best).
    I purchased several of the following (Solwise is the UK version of the units made by Aztech):

    http://www.solwise.co.uk/net-powerline-500av-piggy.htm

    Features:

    (1) Gigabit sockets.
    (2) Rated maximum speed 500 Mbits/sec.
    (3) Filters out noise from devices plugged into the "piggy" socket, thereby preventing that noise entering the mains and reducing throughput. One source of noise: the PC itself!

    I use my powerline adapters to connect my NAS to my HTPC, but this is only for off-line storage; I do not stream video from the NAS to watch on the HTPC. Typically I get a sustained throughput of just over 100 Mbits/sec. This will obviously depend on the quality of your household wiring, and how near or far the sockets are from each other.

    I generally find that the useful sustained throughput of any connection (USB or ethernet) is around one third of the maximum rated speed. There are various chipsets in use for powerline adapters; this page gives an overview (with performance figures):

    http://www.solwise.co.uk/net-powerline-chipsets.htm

    Finally, it seems that powerline adapters in general can be a bit fussy with regard to connecting. You may have no problem connecting a mixture of units, but you are less likely to encounter problems if you use the same brand and same model of adapter everywhere on your network.

    -- from CyberSimian in the UK
     

    eetaylog

    Portal Pro
    March 6, 2007
    874
    41
    39
    South London
    England England
    Good posts thanks, think ill stick with running some cat5e. Was hoping there'd be a reliable powerline option out there but every time I read about them I get similar answers that they're a bit sketchy for any real world video streaming. At least cable will be reliable.
     

    mm1352000

    Development Group
  • Team MediaPortal
  • September 1, 2008
    21,571
    8,218
    New Zealand New Zealand
    Country flag
    @eetaylog
    Have you been testing with live TV and/or recordings, or other video content?

    I ask because I remember reading that @Owlsroost has been testing his latest modifications against a power-line network, with good results:
    https://forum.team-mediaportal.com/...ching-for-testing.130394/page-14#post-1148823

    If you are testing with TV, it might be interesting to try the experimental TsReaders (and TsWriters???) from that thread (and increasing the registry buffer setting - "BufferingDelayInMilliSeconds"). I think your results would certainly be appreciated if you're willing to take the time to try this.

    P.S. If there's a choice, I'd always recommend a wired network over wireless or power-line. However, sometimes there's not a choice... or it is significantly more difficult to use wired.
     

    Owlsroost

    Development Group
  • Team MediaPortal
  • October 28, 2008
    5,540
    5,038
    Cambridge
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Country flag
    Good posts thanks, think ill stick with running some cat5e. Was hoping there'd be a reliable powerline option out there but every time I read about them I get similar answers that they're a bit sketchy for any real world video streaming. At least cable will be reliable.

    If you can run CATx cables, that is the fastest. most reliable, network interconnection. Next most reliable is Powerline, with WiFi the least reliable.

    For streaming live video and audio, it isn't generally the bandwidth/speed that is the problem with Powerline and WiFi, it's the dropouts caused by interference from other things e.g. Fridges on Powerline, Microwave ovens on 2.4GHz WiFi. Losing the connection for a second will disrupt playback...

    If you want to try the latest (experimental) TsReader and TsWriter versions mm1352000 mentions, this post points to the recommended versions to try - https://forum.team-mediaportal.com/...ching-for-testing.130394/page-18#post-1150375 .

    For test purposes I have a TV server connected to my router via a 500AV Powerline network, and client laptop connected to router by 802.11n WiFi (usually connecting at about 100-150 Mbit/s). That normally works OK, but it sometimes takes up to 500ms read a block of data from the server, compared to 50ms on average.
     

    JimCatMP

    Documentation Group
  • Team MediaPortal
  • April 1, 2010
    648
    281
    Leeds
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Country flag
    FYI - I've used Powerline for long time with good results [mostly].

    Current generation is TP-Link 200MBs units - 2 x 3 port switch units for NAS/Main TV/Smart TV & Dev Boxs 1,2&3 + 2 single port units for TV Server and router Link.

    TV is ONLY SD, but works without issue or delay, HD content from NAS to Dev boxes works fine.. All units are on the same spur, as is fridge [currently whining and signing behind me], chest freezer, washing machine, disk washer, drier and what ever else happens to be plugged in

    Reliable and quick however individual units will freeze and need power cycle - less than 1 event per month.

    When tried using on different spur, performance was terrible - wifi clearly better there for example, so your specific circumstances on wiring & probably it's age will have significant impact on how well or otherwise it works for you.

    Fail rate - this is higher than any other standard bit of kit I've used - not silly but significantly more, I would not expect 7rs plus [which is my external gateway & NAS laptop] operational life:(

    TTFN - JCMP.
     

    Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

    Top Bottom