Modern TVs 60Hz

Discussion in 'General' started by eetaylog, November 27, 2015.

  1. eetaylog

    eetaylog Portal Pro

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    Im browsing TVs at the moment to replace our 10 year old plasma and it seems to me that most modern TVs these days run at 60Hz.

    Does anyone have any experience in getting decent framerate playback with this refresh rate as surely its an awkward multiple of 24Hz and 25/50Hz that most video files fall under (even with MP Audio Renderer running to match framerates).


     
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  3. lisag
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    Most modern TV's these days have the capability to switch to 24hz when it detects that refresh rate being input. What makes and models are you looking at?
     
  4. eetaylog

    eetaylog Portal Pro

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    Thanks for the reply. I generally buy Samsung stuff as i like the build and picture quality without having to fork out Sony Bravia prices. I was looking at one of their 48" 4K TVs earlier as a possibility. What do you think, and do you have any other recommendations (im looking at ~50" in the £500-700 price range)?...

    http://www.ebuyer.com/708026-samsung-48ju6400-48-uhd-4k-smart-led-tv-ue48ju6400kxxu

    TIA
     
  5. lisag
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    lisag Retired Team Member

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    I did a (very quick) hunt around the internet on that model, and it looks like it can do 1920 x 1080 @ 24hz, although this guy doesn't seem too happy with it:



    There may be some issues with 4K TV's and which resolutions / refresh rates they support.

    I last bought a TV in July when I moved house, I hardly have any 4K content (none really) most of my viewing is 1080p, some 720p and some SD, so I avoided the 4K Tv's for now. I got last years Sony Bravia model from John Lewis, 55 inch with 3D (rubbish but a bit fun) for £650 with 5 year warranty. I thought that would give 4K TV's and content a chance to bed down.

    lisa
     
  6. eetaylog

    eetaylog Portal Pro

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    Yeah, i don't imagine that I'll be using 4k content regularly for a few years but I tend to buy TVs for the long term so im just looking to futureproof.

    Just not sure why they seem to be leaning towards 60hz hardware when it will make it incompatible with most video framerates. Like you say, maybe best to wait and see which direction they go with it.
     
  7. lisag
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    lisag Retired Team Member

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    My fear is that if you will be watching HD and SD content on it, will it look worse than your current TV, or than a new HD TV?
    You could try a store such as Richer Sounds that do demo's, see if you can go in and connect a laptop or other device to it and playback some content to see.

    I am not sure if 4K TV's do something weird with refresh rates, but I have 3 modern flat screens in the house, all HD (1080p) screens, and they all have MP1 clients conected to them with auto refresh rate changing enabled, so they all auto switch between 24 / 50 / 60 depending on the content that is being played.
     
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  8. CyberSimian
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    When I started using WMC, I had a Toshiba LCD TV dating from 2006. I initially used the VGA connection, as my graphics adapter did not have an HDMI connection. The problem with VGA is the refresh rate -- it does 60Hz and higher, but not 50Hz. :(

    The problem with 60Hz is that it gives visible artefacts with TV in the UK, especially when the camera pans horizontally. The need to generate 60 frames/sec output from a video stream that is 50 frames/sec means that the graphics adapter must show a frame twice after every 5 frames, and this leads to visible discontinuities in the picture when the image is panning horizontally (e.g. sports programmes). :cry:

    I eventually got a graphics adapter with an HDMI connection, and used that to connect to the Toshiba, and the Toshiba then used 50Hz, which eliminated the visible artefacts. I should mention (having discussed this some years ago on the GreenButton forum), that at least one user reported using 60Hz in the UK with no visible artefacts. Maybe his TV was more advanced than mine, and was able to do some sort of clever conversion of 50Hz input to 60Hz output, or maybe he did not notice the visible artefacts. o_O

    Earlier this year I purchased a 55-inch Sony Bravia from John Lewis for £770, complete with 5-years guarantee and free Sony sound bar (which I did not want). But it is only 1080p, which is enough for me. I think that it will be decades before terrestrial free-to-air 4K broadcasting starts, and streaming from the internet does not appeal. :D

    I would be really surprised if TVs in the UK cannot do 50Hz. Surely, more of the world uses 50Hz electric mains than uses 60Hz electric mains? :confused:

    -- from CyberSimian in the UK
     
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  9. eetaylog

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    Good posts ^^

    As for UK TVs being able to handle 50Hz though, its difficult to say because refresh rate capabilities seem lacking in most online product descriptions, which seems crazy given what an impact on playback experience a mismatched video rate will produce.

    Maybe ill just stick to looking at 1080p tvs for now. Its not as if 4k wont play at all on them even if the technology became mainstream in the next few years.
     
  10. eetaylog

    eetaylog Portal Pro

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    Ok, so looking at the samsung 1080p options it looks like the main point that it boils down to is whether to go for a later 240Hz 8000 series option, or whether the older 120Hz series are suitable enough.

    The way is see it 240Hz is a direct multiple of both 60fps and 24fps video and 96% compatible with 50fps (MP audio renderer would be able to scale 250Hz down to 240Hz relatively easily idve thought).

    By contrast a 120Hz TV is a multiple of both 60fps and 24fps but only 80% compatible with 50fps (nearest multiples are 100Hz or 150Hz). This would mean a harder job of frame matching for MP audio renderer.

    Thoughts?
     
  11. lisag
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    If you look online at the manual of the TV I am pretty sure it would support most resolutions at 50 hz, certainly the main ones anyway, 1080p and 720p.

    As I said, all three of my 1080p TV's detect what refresh rate is being input and auto switch between 24 / 50 / 60 hz without issue.
     
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